HomeREVIEWS2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 Review

2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 Review

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The Hyundai Ioniq, a hybrid and plug-in hybrid hatchback based on the Prius concept, is probably familiar to you. Hyundai now uses the Ioniq name to launch several electric vehicles. In 2022, Hyundai will introduce the all-electric Ioniq 5, a compact crossover SUV with a big style and technology.

There are two battery packs available for the Ioniq 5: a 58-kWh pack (delayed availability) or a 77.4-kWh pack. It comes with a single electric motor that drives the rear wheels, and it will be the base model for the Ioniq 5 range. With the larger battery in the Ioniq 5, the vehicle is either rear-wheel drive or has an additional motor up front that gives it all-wheel drive.

During our real-world range test, we were able to cover 277 miles on a full charge in an AWD Ioniq 5. In comparison with some other rival EVs we tested (a comparable Ford Mustang Mach-E covered 304 miles), that’s a bit disappointing, but it should still satisfy most EV owners.

On the plus side, the Ioniq 5’s electrical system is compatible with the latest fast-charging DC stations. Hyundai claims that connecting the Ioniq 5 to a 350-kW charger would allow you to charge the battery from 10% to 80% in just 18 minutes. You can also power electronics, tools and other gear from the Ioniq 5’s battery pack.

All of this is topped off by Hyundai’s stylish exterior, a large digital infotainment screen, and many available features. 

Performance, Power and EV Motor

Powertrains available on the Ioniq 5 include multiple electric options. One rear-mounted electric motor coupled with a standard-range battery generates 168 horsepower. The Ioniq 5 can accelerate to 60 mph in 7.4 seconds with the longer-range battery and the rear-drive configuration, which provides 225 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque. All-wheel-drive versions are significantly more powerful, with 320 horsepower and 446 pound-feet of torque, and faster. The car reached 60 mph in just 4.5 seconds at our test track. Our only wish is that its steering provided more feedback and the suspension was a tad firmer.

Battery Life, Charging and Range

Using the standard 58.0-kWh battery pack, the Ioniq 5 is expected to provide a range of 220 miles. With dual motors, the larger 77.4-kWh battery pack can deliver 256 miles and with a single motor, 303 miles. Using a DC fast charger, Hyundai claims the larger battery can be charged from 10 to 80 percent in around 18 minutes or added 68 miles in five minutes.

Real-World MPGe and Fuel Economy

Its estimated fuel efficiency with the long-range battery and rear-wheel drive is 114 MPGe, but dropping to 98 MPGe with all-wheel drive. It is expected that the EV SUV will get 110 MPGe combined when equipped with rear-wheel drive and a standard range battery. We can evaluate their real-world efficiency once we test them on the 75-mph highway route, which is part of our extensive testing regimen. On the EPA website, you can find more information about the Ioniq 5’s fuel economy.

Comfort, Interior and Cargo

The interior of the Ioniq 5 is not exactly as artsy as the cabin of the Hyundai 45 Concept, but it’s still filled with tech-savvy features, including a digital dashboard and lots of eco-friendly materials. One of the fanciful features is the head-up display that can project navigation directions on the windshield. With a completely flat floor and an all-electric design, the compact crossover offers maximum passenger and cargo space. During the charging process, passengers can rest their feet on the footrests while the Ioniq is reclining. The Hyundai 5 offers more front- and rear-seat space than the Hyundai Palisade’s three rows. There is plenty of storage space in its large console, and on Limited trims, it slides between the two front seats.

A Dual-Screen Dash and Powerful Engine

Using the infotainment screen, you can also check the vehicle’s range, battery capacity, and charging time (once you plug it in). As well as showing battery range, the onboard navigation system can also locate nearby charging stations. 

The majority of connectivity options are handled by Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, except for those included in Hyundai’s subscription-based Bluelink system (free for three years). You can store vehicle settings in the cloud with Bluelink, and it offers typical telematics features like automatic crash notifications. With the Bluelink app, you can remotely unlock or lock the doors, control the climate, and locate charging stations according to their type and availability

It isn’t as fast as a Mustang Mach E or Tesla, but the Hyundai Ioniq 5 is plenty powerful for everyday driving. There are four driving modes – Eco, Normal, Sport, and Snow – and four regenerative-braking modes. The Sport mode gives the best performance.

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